Some Massachusetts vaping illnesses linked to legal cannabis stores

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Some Massachusetts vaping illnesses linked to legal cannabis stores

Half a dozen Massachusetts residents, apparently suffering from vaping-related lung illnesses, said they bought products from state-licensed marijuana dispensaries, marking the first time the state health department linked illnesses to legal vaping products. David O’Brien, the president of the Massachusetts Cannabis Business Association, told The Boston Globe the state should immediately disclose which licensed operators were potentially implicated in the six cases linked to regulated products.

– Associated Press

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High Times marijuana magazine in danger of folding

High Times Holding might need to shut financially struggling High Times magazine, the California-based publisher disclosed in its latest SEC filing. In the filing, High Times Holdings said “there is substantial doubt about the company’s ability to continue as a going concern.” The company blamed “recurring operating losses, net operating cash flow deficits, and an accumulated deficit” for its one-year forecast that it might not be able to continue to publish the magazine, the New York Post reported. High Times Holding had a net loss of $11.9 million for the six months ending June 30 on revenue of $10.7 million.

Maine accepting recreational cannabis applications

Maine cleared a major hurdle on its path to legalize the sale of adult-use cannabis by launching the application process for businesses seeking to sell recreational marijuana. The state also began taking applications from marijuana businesses that want to manufacture or cultivate marijuana for adult use.

– Associated Press

Report: Dearth of rules led to marijuana job cuts

A “lack of cannabis regulations” cost 100 people their jobs at one company this year, according to a new report by Chicago-based outplacement firm Challenger, Gray & Christmas. While representing a small percentage of the 559,713 positions eliminated in the United States in the first 11 months of 2019, the marijuana industry lost more jobs than other sectors, including contract disputes, privatization or climate legislation, BNN Bloomberg reported. The Challenger report doesn’t identify the company behind the marijuana layoffs, but California-based Weedmaps – which advertises cannabis sellers on its website – cut more than 100 jobs in October.